When I was teaching in the elementary grades, I used quotations and sayings as a writing prompt every day. I began each morning with a positive and challenging thought. After I retired, I wanted to share these writing prompts with teachers and parents, to use with their children. I organized them using a different character-building theme for each month and called it Thought for the Day, 365 Journal Writing Prompts to Challenge Students to Write with Purpose & Meaning. I love to see students challenged to think!

Try some of these prompts:

April 12 “Unless someone like you, cares a whole awful lot, nothing is going to get better, it’s not.” (Dr. Seuss) Dr. Seuss liked to write rhymes.  What do you think this rhyme means?

Or challenge your students to write about….”A book is like a garden carried in your pocket.”  Can you explain this old Chinese proverb? Remember, a garden is something to be enjoyed.

My brain is amazing! It helps me learn and think wonderful thoughts.”  Write some amazing things you have figured out with your brain.

“The truth of the matter is that you always know the right thing to do. The hard part is doing it.” (Norman Schwarzkoph) Write about a time it was hard for you to do the right thing.

I began each school day with a writing prompt, math challenge and spelling/language mix-up to correct. After the students finished,  we would discuss their answers.  It’s a great way to get the students ready to learn and their brains in gear! I remember quite a lively discussion about honesty and doing the right thing!

For September, the theme is back-to-school, responsibility, reading and self-improvement.
October’s theme is getting along, DARE week, and Columbus Day.
November teaches students about being thankful, goodness, books and remembering our veterans.

Memorization is good for the brain, so memorize some of your favorite quotations or sayings.

Check out the book and let me know what you think.

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